IN/SITE: REFLECTIONS ON THE ART OF PLACE

In/Site: Reflections on the Art of Place is my blog devoted to art, architecture and urbanism, using Chicago as a vantage point for reflections on the work of contemporary artists, public art and urban projects that reinvent the spatial environment of the city. In/Site offers a quasi-geographical focus on the topic of art and urbanism, what cultural theorist Rosalyn Deutsche refers to as an “urban-aesthetic,” through essays and reviews that analyze how artists, as creative agents and critical thinkers, reimagine the physical and conceptual spaces that culture can occupy. The impetus for In/Site comes from the desire to retool my critical writing and to reengage with artists and ideas that are often absent from the mainstream art press. The title, while referring to various site-specific art practices, spins on the idea of site as a physical and geographic space, and on a vision of place (or insight) that is contextual and self-conscious.

This project is supported by the Creative Capital / Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grants Program.

See my latest post below or visit the blog here.

To Belong: Narratives on Citizenship and Migration

May 18, 2019

Loss takes many forms. Within the last two years, I lost both my parents and a sister. Their passings were followed by much personal grief, of course, as well as an existential rethinking about the meaning of absence and belonging. What binds us to place, to each other, to the larger world? And while loss is inherent to the cycles of life that define who we are as human beings, catastrophic loss – whether by violence, poverty, social oppression, climate change, or environmental disaster – plagues our political present, rupturing the ties that connect us to home and to the earth beneath our feet. Mass movements in global migration come out of such devastation and upheaval, in 2018 displacing 68.5 million people according to the United Nations Refugee Agency (Note 1). This decade’s flow of people across physical and geopolitical borders has ignited contentious debates on the definition of citizenship and the role of government in protecting individual and collective rights.

Read more at In/Site