A publishing career that spans over 30 years, critic and editor Susan Snodgrass writes about contemporary art, art criticism, material art practices, architecture, urbanism, and public art.

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New Book Out Now!

At long last, my book Inside the Matrix: The Radical Designs of Ken Isaacs published by Half Letter Press is now available. Inside the Matrix surveys the highly individual practice of American architect and designer Ken Isaacs, whose populist, DIY designs created from the 1950s to the 1970s challenged mainstream definitions of modernism. Highlighted here are his Living Structures, Microhouses, and Alpha Chambers, experimental living and educational environments that provided alternative solutions to the spatial and environmental challenges of midcentury modern life.

IN/SITE: Reflections on the Art of Place

In/Site: Reflections on the Art of Place is my blog devoted to art, architecture and urbanism, using Chicago as a vantage point for reflections on the work of contemporary artists, public art and urban projects that reinvent the spatial environment of the city.

Preview my latest post below or view all posts.

Flag Art: Raising New Symbols of Belonging

November 19, 2020

As the end to a most trying year draws near, hopes for a fairer and more equitable future are weighted against the injustices of the present that attempt to erode the very foundations of our democracy. Even in the wake of the U.S. election’s positive outcome, conservative politicians and right-wing extremists, cloaked in the guise of patriotism, continue to exploit symbols of freedom, including the American flag, to bolster a dangerous authoritarian nationalism and commit atrocities against American citizens, immigrants, indigenous peoples, and Earth.  Fraught with a myriad of conflicting meanings, the American flag is a symbol of both freedom and oppression, filled with promises – some realized, others unfulfilled. And yet, it continues to incite passion for the principles it purports to uphold and for those who have fought on their behalf. When activist Abbie Hoffman appeared before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1968 wearing a button-down shirt patterned…

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